Monday, February 22, 2016

Planetfall Available on Amazon and Goodreads

Greeting fellow Questarians,

I was surfing the web recently, following leads and analysing data for the latest Star Trek update when I discovered two fascinating Science Fiction novels titled Planetfall. You might call this a classic Star Trek "Nomad" moment.

The authors Emma Newman and Ian Jaymes have both penned and published books with the same title. So there you have it. The good news is Emmas Newman's book is available in paperback on Goodreads and you can get Ian Jaymes short story for your Kindle Reader on Amazon. Enjoy!




QUESTIONS: In our information space age with the evolution of technology in daily life, what can be done to avoid this sort of thing? I wonder what would Captain Kirk do? Is this an authors worst nightmare or can a happy compromise be reached?

What would you do if this happened to you?

 Live long and Prosper, trekkers and trekkies

13 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Good find!
As an author, I'd prefer a unique title. And if you type Cassa into Amazon, only my three titles appear.

Spacerguy said...

It wasn't my plan to write about Planetfall today. I wish both authors and their books success. It just goes to show interest in sci-fi epics is incredible. The bottom line here is writers can't copyright their book titles apparently but curiously it is possible for an author to make a trademark application

Christine Rains said...

I prefer an original title too, but I have one book called "Fearless" and there are several others by that name. I just have to play up what else is unique about my book.

Spacerguy said...

Until recently I used to think written publications were automatically copyrighted and that included the title.

Bish Denham said...

Certainly a unique title is preferable, but as they can't be copyrighted, there will always be books with the same name. With a little research on Goodreads you can discover just how many books are called Planetfall or have the word in their title.

Jeffrey Scott said...

I'm actually writing a book on this phenomenon, because it's something that shouldn't happen.
Ironically enough, I'm titling the book, 'Planetfall'.
:D

Tony Laplume said...

Probably happens far more often than anyone realizes. Voyager angered fans (among other reasons) for naming its final episode "Endgame," which had already been used by Babylon 5. Next Generation had an episode named "The Emissary," and the first episode of Deep Space Nine was called "Emissary." Next Generation also had an episode named "First Contact," and of course later had a moved called...First Contact. It's not something I get worked up about. For the record, I think the original series' "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky" is pretty safe.

Susan Kane said...

I'd be confused until I saw the covers and read the blurb on the back.

Elephant's Child said...

How frustrating. For both authors. With luck they will get some spin-off business from each other.

Victoria Marie Lees said...

It would be interesting to see how different the plots are, wouldn't it? I think Kirk would choose the shorter version as he didn't have much down time and isn't the sedentary thinker type. However, I think Spock would read the longer of the two stories and then contemplate the possibilities. What would I do if my book had the same title as another? I'd be mad at myself for not checking more closely that no other book had the same title. Depending on the authors here, if each has a good following, they would recognize the difference in book presentation right away.

I'm blog hopping with C. Lee McKenzie, et al. I like your blog and will be back. I'll also follow your blog and connect with you on social media. Thanks for sharing this.

DMS said...

Wow! I really like the covers on both of these. I am especially curious about Planetfall by Emma Newman. :)
~Jess

cleemckenzie said...

Titles are up for grabs. No copyright on those. But I'm not sure I like having the same title as someone else. Still, who knows how that would affect a book. No me.

Spacerguy said...

I think the unspoken cardinal rule in journalism, writing, blogging etc is Quotes are fine but absolutely No Plagiarism! To knowingly copycat is unforgivable.

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